Media Double Game Against Bilawal?

Aug 6th, 2010 | By | Category: Daily Times, Dawn, Express Tribune, Jang, The Nation, The News

Last night Bilawal Bhutto Zardari released a statement about his immediate future. In short, he says, “I am currently looking into the possibility of studying law” and will not be jumping into politics as widely reported. According to his statement, Bilawal felt compelled to act out, “to counter some inaccurate information that has recently been reported”. While there was certainly much media attention to the alleged speech planned for Saturday, what is more telling is the way Bilawal’s future and his more immediate decision to open a donation center for flood victims has been treated in the news media.

On Thursday, Dawn reported that “Speech by Bilawal fuels talk of political career”.

But now he has finished his history degree at Christ Church, seen as one of the most aristocratic of Oxford’s colleges, speculation is growing about what steps he will now take towards his political destiny.

Bhutto, who is already chairman of the PPP, is expected to speak before several thousand of its supporters at an event in Birmingham, central England, alongside his father who is visiting Britain.

It was not so far fetched for media to report that Bilawal would be at the rally scheduled for Saturday since Waheed Rasab, the PPP’s coordinator in Britain, told reporters as much. But the truth is, this was mostly speculation.

As a result, Dawn reported today about Bilawal’s statment.

Bilawal Bhutto Zardari on Thursday spoke for the first time in many months, only to categorically deny the prevalent impression created by a section of the media that he was to launch his political career over the weekend by attending a public meeting in Birmingham.

One has to wonder, with all the speculation about whether Bilawal will make a speech and enter politics, all the party coordinators and “anonymous sources” who were telling what was going to happen – why did no journalist actually bother to ask Bilawal what he thinks?

More disturbing, though, is that even Bilawal’s statement has not stopped certain media companies from continuing political attacks in their reporting.

The Nation‘s report on the statement includes the following conclusion:

The sources said that PPP took decision not to launch political career of Bilawal Bhutto Zaradri due to severe criticism launched by the media and politicians that in tough circumstance, President Zardari has left for UK to launch political career of his son.

Nowhere in the article does it reveal who these “sources” are, or what their evidence is for this claim, of course. This seems like a pretty transparent attempt for the media to take the credit for something that Bilawal is doing. So, when Bilawal does something they don’t like, it is his fault. When he does something they do like, The Nation claims credit.

The News, however, is even worse. On 1 August, the newspaper wrote that Bilawal “would do well by stepping in to cancel the ceremony and instead setting about to prove himself a worthy leader through more solid action rather than flamboyant gestures.”

Upon the release of Bilawal’s statement, however, The News quickly changed its tune. This morning’s newspaper is actually critical of Bilawal’s move.

Chairman of the PPP Bilawal Bhutto Zardari dramatically declared last night that he would not address the Birmingham rally on Saturday, August 07, putting cold water on the plans that he would be launched as the party chief and adding a new sense of drama to the countrywide campaign against President Zardari.

In a dramatic climbdown, the 21-year-old son of Benazir said that he would continue with his studies and wanted to stay away from the media. The move comes as a humiliation to the party mandarins who were preparing for weeks for his grand entry into politics.

It is worth noting here that The News may have slipped in admitting that there is a “campaign against President Zardari”. Of course, this should not be a surprise to readers of The News, which has a sordid history recently of publishing unsubstantiated political attacks.

But it is especially important to note that the political bias of The News is clearly evident in their inability to give proper recognition to Bilawal even when he does something that the very newspaper says it hopes for! Rather than praising Bilawal for canceling his appearance and setting up a donation point for flood victims, The News calls the move “a humiliation”. This is a double game against Bilawal – damned if you do, damned if you don’t.

To their credit, Dawn, Daily Times and Express Tribune reported the development without infusing an opinion into their reporting. This shows that there are some journalists content to simply report the facts, and this should be encouraged.

Still, we must look at this episode as a part of the ongoing problem with media speculation, wishful journalism, substituting opinions for facts, and playing political double games. Bilawal aside, we all deserve better.

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  1. GEO Group has taken over ARY Group due to default of 3 Million Dollar:) Hence the appearance of Dr Shahid Masood on ARY:)

  2. ’بارہ نجی چینلز ٹیکس ڈیفالٹر ہیں‘
    آخری وقت اشاعت: جمعـء 14 مئ 2010 , 14:28 GMT 19:28 PST

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/urdu/pakistan/2010/05/100514_channels_tax_defaulters.shtml

    پاکستان کے وزیر محنت و افرادی قوت سید خورشید احمد شاہ نےقومی اسمبلی کو بتایا ہے کہ ٹیکس نادہندگان میں بارہ نجی ٹی وی چینلز بھی شامل ہیں اور ان کی طرف حکومت کے تقریباً پونے تین ارب روپے کے ٹیکس بقایاجات ہیں۔

    جمعہ کو حکومت اور حزب مخالف کے بعض اراکین کے توجہ دلاؤ نوٹس کا جواب دیتے ہوئے انہوں نے بتایا کہ اِن ٹی وی چینلز نے یہ رقم اشتہارات کے مد میں حاصل تو کی ہے لیکن حکومت کو ادا نہیں کر رہے۔

    خورشید شاہ کے مطابق ٹیکس نادہندگان میں سرِفہرست جیو ٹی وی ہے جس کے ذمے ایک ارب ارسٹھ کروڑ روپے ہیں۔

    جیو ایک ارب اڑسٹھ کروڑ، اے آر وائی ون انتالیس کروڑ ستر لاکھ روپے، ٹی وی ون آٹھ کروڑ، پلے ٹی وی دو کروڑ، سماء ٹی وی ایک کروڑ اڑتیس لاکھ، ہم ٹی وی ستاون لاکھ، انڈس ٹی وی سولہ کروڑ جبکہ ایم ٹی وی ساٹھ کروڑ روپے کا ڈیفالٹر ہے۔
    انہوں نے بتایا کہ اس کے علاوہ اے آر وائی ون انتالیس کروڑ ستر لاکھ روپے، ٹی وی ون آٹھ کروڑ، پلے ٹی وی دو کروڑ، سماء ٹی وی ایک کروڑ اڑتیس لاکھ، ہم ٹی وی ستاون لاکھ، انڈس ٹی وی سولہ کروڑ جبکہ ایم ٹی وی ساٹھ کروڑ روپے کا ڈیفالٹر ہے۔

    اسلام آباد میں بی بی سی کے نامہ نگار اعجاز مہر کا کہنا ہے کہ توجہ دلاؤ نوٹس کے ذریعے پوچھا گیا تھا کہ ایک کروڑ یا اس سے زیادہ رقم کے ٹیکس نادہندگاں کی فہرست میں کون کون شامل ہیں اور ان کے نام ایوان میں پیش کریں لیکن ایوان میں مالیات کے وزیر کی جگہ جواب دیتے ہوئے سید خورشید شاہ نے صرف میڈیا گروپس کے نام پیش کیے اور بتایا کہ کسٹم ڈیوٹی کے مد میں تراسی افراد/ کمپنیوں کے ذمے چالیس کروڑ روپے کے ٹیکس بقایاجات ہیں۔

    آئے روز ٹی وی چینلز پر حساب مانگا جاتا ہے اور آج پتہ چلا ہے کہ میڈیا خود ڈیفالٹر ہے۔ آئندہ ہم ان سے سوال کریں گے کہ پہلے خود ٹیکس دو پھر ہم سے پوچھیں۔
    شیخ وقاص اکرم
    مسلم لیگ (ق) کے رکن ریاض فتیانہ نے کہا کہ سیاستدان تو اگر آبیانہ یا کسی گیسٹ ہاؤس کے چارجز ادا نہ کرے تو وہ انتخاب نہیں لڑ سکتا لیکن اتنے بڑے ڈیفالٹرز کے خلاف کارروائی کیوں نہیں ہوتی۔ انہوں نے کہا کہ ٹیکس نادہندہ کوئی بھی ہو حکومت ان سے ٹیکس وصول کرے ۔ ان کے مطابق اگر پاکستان میں بڑے بڑے مگر مچھ ایمانداری سے ٹیکس ادا کریں تو ملک کو کشکول لے کر پھرنے اور قرضوں کی ضرورت نہیں پڑے گی۔

    شیخ وقاص اکرم کا کہنا تھا کہ آئے روز ٹی وی چینلز پر حساب مانگا جاتا ہے اور آج پتہ چلا ہے کہ میڈیا خود ڈیفالٹر ہے۔ انہوں نے کہا ’آئندہ ہم ان سے سوال کریں گے کہ پہلے خود ٹیکس دو پھر ہم سے پوچھیں‘۔

    جس پر سید خورشید شاہ نے کہا کہ انیس سو ستتر سے لے کر آج تک بینکوں سے قرض معاف کرانے اور ٹیکس چوری کرنے والے سیاستدانوں، میڈیا گروپس، کاروباریوں اور دیگر کی فہرست آئندہ اجلاس میں ایوان میں پیش کریں گے۔

    شیخ وقاص اکرم، ریاض فتیانہ اور عبدالقادر خانزادہ نے کہا کہ سیاستدانوں کا بھی بتائیں کہ کون کتنا ٹیکس دیتا ہے؟۔ جس پر سید خورشید شاہ نے کہا کہ وہ یہ تفصیلات بھی آئندہ ایوان میں پیش کریں گے۔

  3. Tax defaulters in Pakistani media: E&C Division-V RTO, Karachi – by Farhad Jarral http://criticalppp.com/archives/10928/comment-page-1#comment-8289

  4. Now read this Joker and his point of view during the early years of Musharraf Martial Law: Shaheen Sehabi on the Accountability of Media/Press. http://chagataikhan.blogspot.com/2009/10/shaheen-sehabi-on-accountability-of.html

  5. Jang Group VS Dr. Shahid Masood & ARY ONE World.
    http://chagataikhan.blogspot.com/2009/11/jang-group-vs-dr-shahid-masood-ary-one.html

  6. Transparency in Pakistan’s Media, Benazir and the US Friday, December 26th, 2008 at 1:22 am By Yousuf Nazar http://www.yousufnazar.com/?p=788

  7. The Jang Group – how low the standards would fall? Saturday, April 10th, 2010 at 9:56 pm By Yousuf Nazar http://www.yousufnazar.com/?p=939

  8. Credibility at its best!

    Brigadier (R) Imtiaz & Confusion of Jang Group of Newspapers. http://chagataikhan.blogspot.com/2009/11/brigadier-r-imtiaz-confusion-of-jang.html

  9. Dazed and Confused: Rauf Klasra, Ansar Abbasi & Brigadier (R) Imtiaz.
    http://chagataikhan.blogspot.com/2009/09/dazed-and-confused-rauf-klasra-ansar.html

  10. Dr Shahid Masood more lies Hidden Truth of Jawab Deh [1/4]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O5pJ8CZFbOU&feature=related

  11. Iftikhar Ahmed of Jawabdeh had resigned from GEO on above episode:

    Geo ‘Jawabdeh’ host Iftikhar Ahmed resigns in protest Monday, November 17, 2008 http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2008\11\17\story_17-11-2008_pg7_34 LAHORE: Iftikhar Ahmed, the host of Geo TV show ‘Jawabdeh’, resigned on Sunday after the channel administration refused to air an interview with former Pakistan Television managing director Shahid Masood. The interview was recorded last week and was being advertised in the group’s The News and Jang newspapers. On Sunday, the Geo TV administration seized the original recording and declined to run it. Iftikhar Ahmed told Aaj Kal he was being pressured to censor parts of the interview but he did not compromise on principles and resigned. aaj kal report

  12. Ahmadi massacre silence is dispiriting – The virtual conspiracy of silence after the murder of 94 Ahmadis in Pakistan exposes the oppression suffered by the sect Declan Walsh Monday 7 June 2010 14.59 BST http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/belief/2010/jun/07/ahmadi-massacre-silence-pakistan

    Candles were lit by members of a civil society for victims of the attack on the Ahmadiyya sect in Lahore. Photograph: KM Chaudary/AP

    I often find myself defending Pakistan against the unbidden prejudices of the outside world. No, Islam is not the cause of terrorism. Yes, the Taliban is a complex phenomenon. No, Imran Khan is not a major political figure.

    This past week, though, I am silent. The massacre of 94 members of the minority Ahmadiyya community on May 28 has exposed something ugly at the heart of Pakistan – its laws, its rulers, its society.

    It’s not the violence that disturbs most, gut-churning as it was. During Friday prayers two teams of attackers stormed Ahmadiyya mosques in the eastern city of Lahore. They fired Kalashnikovs from minarets, chucked grenades into the crowds, exploded their suicide vests.

    As the massacre unfolded, a friend called – his father-in-law, a devout Ahmadi, was inside one of the besieged mosques. The family, glued to live television coverage, were sick with worry.

    Two hours later, my friend’s relative emerged alive. But many of his friends – old men, including a retired general and former judge – were dead.

    The killers were quickly identified as “Punjabi Taliban” – a loose collective of local extremists with ties to the tribal belt. This was unsurprising. More dispiriting, however, was the wider reaction.

    Human rights groups reacted with pre-programmed outrage; otherwise there was a virtual conspiracy of silence. A dribble of protesters attended street protests against the attack in Lahore and Karachi; eleven people showed up in Islamabad.

    The normally vociferous media were unusually reticent. Commentators expressed dismay at the violence, but few dared voice support for the Ahmadiyya community itself. Politicians turned yellow.

    Few visited the bereaved; still today, the chief minister of Punjab, Shahbaz Sharif, has not visited the bullet-pocked mosques or offered compensation to the injured.

    In the national parliament, three brave female MPs crossed party lines to propose a resolution condemning the attacks, in the face of massive indifference. The motion passed, just.

    The reticence is rooted in law and history. Ahmadis believe that Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, a 19th century Punjabi cleric, was the messiah sent by God – a notion that deeply offends orthodox Muslims for whom Muhammad, who lived in 7th-century Arabia, is the final prophet.

    The problem is that the state has taken sides in this religious argument. Since the 1970s, civilian and military governments have passed laws enshrining the discrimination against Ahmadis, today thought to number about 4 million in Pakistan.

    And so they live in the shadows of society. Under the law, Ahmadis may not call themselves Muslims and may not refer to their places of worship as “mosques”. Orthodox Muslims applying for a passport must sign a statement deriding Ahmad as an “imposter”.

    Any Ahmadi who defies these edicts can be sentenced to death; in 2009, 37 were charged under the blasphemy laws and 57 under Ahmadi-specific laws.

    This state-directed discrimination has caused prejudice to soak into the bones of even well-educated Pakistanis. It is acceptable to denigrate Ahmadis as “agents of foreign powers” such as the CIA and Raw, India’s intelligence service.

    In 2008 a prominent preacher on Geo, the country’s largest channel, suggested that right-minded Muslims should kill Ahmadis. Within 48 hours two Ahmadis had been lynched. The television presenter has prospered.

    Last year a banner appeared outside the high court in Lahore, declaring “Jews, Christians and Ahmadis are enemies of Islam”. Few complained.

    The silence that followed the Ahmadi killings was broken last week by a tsunami of outrage at the Israeli commando raids on boats headed for Gaza. Commentators and politicians fulminated at the treatment of the Palestinians – a minority that suffers state-sanctioned, religiously driven discrimination. Nobody got the irony.

    It makes one realise how small the constituency of true liberals is in Pakistan – not Pervez Musharraf-style liberals, who drink whisky and attend fashion shows, but people who believe the state should cherish all citizens equally. That, after all, was the publicly expressed desire of Pakistan’s founder, Muhammad Ali Jinnah, 63 years ago. Today it lies in tatters.

  13. PAKISTAN: Two persons murdered after an anchor person proposed the widespread lynching of Ahmadi sect followers ASIAN HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION – URGENT APPEALS PROGRAMME Urgent Appeal Case: AHRC-UAC-203-2008 http://www.ahrchk.net/ua/mainfile.php/2008/2999/

    10 September 2008
    ———————————————————————
    PAKISTAN: Two persons murdered after an anchor person proposed the widespread lynching of Ahmadi sect followers

    ISSUES: Murder; religious discrimination; freedom of religion; media
    ———————————————————————

    Dear friends,

    The Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) has received information that an anchor person working for a prominent television channel has incited Muslims in Pakistan to kill – to devastating effect. The targets are followers of the Muslim Ahmadi sect, a group which has been declared non-Islamic under the constitution of Pakistan. The first killing happened within 24 hours of the broadcast, and just under two days later a district chief of the Ahmadi was murdered. Followers of the religion are understandably frightened, and many have left their homes and are taking shelter at their central mosque, the Rabwa.

    CASE DETAILS:

    In a program aired on 7 September 2008 the anchor of the religious program ‘Alam Online’, Dr. Amir Liaquat Hussain–also former federal minister for religious affairs–declared the murder of Ahmadi sect members to be necessary (Wajib ul Qatal) according to Islamic teachings, because its followers don’t believe in the last prophet, Mohammad, peace be upon him. Dr. Amir repeated his instruction several times, urging fundamentalists Muslims to kill without fear.

    While on air the anchor person also pressured the other two Islamic scholars (from two different sects) on the program to support the statement. This resulted in a unanimous decision among the scholars, on air during a popular television show, to urge lynching with the intent to kill. This was not a one-off. On September 9, Mr. Hussain answered a query with the comment that blasphemers are liable to be put to death.

    According to the information received, at 1:15pm on September 8, 18 hours after the broadcast, six persons entered the Fazle Umer Clinic, a two-story hospital at Mirpur Khas city and two of them went to the second floor and started pressuring 45 year-old Dr. Abdul Manan Siddiqui to come downstairs to attend to a patient in crisis. Dr. Manan left his office and descended into an ambush. He was shot 11 times and died on the spot. His private guard was also shot and is in a serious condition. A woman was also injured by firing. The killers remained at the hospital until the doctor was declared dead, then they walked out of the building’s front entrance. Police registered the killers as unknown.

    On September 9, 48 hours after the broadcast, Mr. Yousaf, a 75 year-old rice trader and district chief of the Ahmadi sect was killed on his way to prayer in Nawab Shah, Sindh province. Yousaf was fired on from people on motor bikes, and sustained three bullet wounds. He died on the way to the hospital. The assailants had taken a route past a police station. No one was arrested.

    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

    The Ahmadi sect was declared non-Islamic sect on September 7, 1974, through a constitutional amendment, and was labeled a minority sect. Since then, there has been open hatred of the sect by certain Islamic circles and fundamentalists across the Muslim world, and sect members suffer widespread discrimination. Ahmadi followers are not allowed to bury their dead in the ordinary grave yards of Muslims, and many of those buried before 1974 were shifted by fundamentalists.

    Since 1984 (when statistics have been compiled) around 93 Ahmadis have been killed for their allegiance to their sect, with four killed so far this year, including Dr. Ghulam Sarwar on March 19 in Faisalabad, Punjab province and Mr. Basharat Mughal on February 24 in Karachi. The Dr. Siddiqui is the 15th medical doctor killed since 1984.

    SUGGESTED ACTION:
    Please write to following authorities and urge them to appropriate actions in order to stop the killings of Ahmadi followers and recognized religious freedom. Please also demand them to prevent any religious hatred or discrimination from broadcasting through the media.

    Please be informed that the AHRC has also written separate letter to the UN Special Rapporteur on freedom of religion or belief.

    To support this appeal, please click here:

    SAMPEL LETTER:

    Dear _______,

    PAKISTAN: Two persons murdered after an anchor person proposed the widespread lynching of Ahmadi sect followers

    Details of victims:
    1. Dr. Abdul Manan Siddiqui, 45 years old; shot dead in the Fazle Umer Clinic, a two-story hospital at Mirpur Khas city on September 8
    2. Mr. Yousaf, 75 years old; rice trader and district chief of the Ahmadi sect; shot dead in Nawab Shah, Sindh province
    Persons involved in broadcasting:
    1. Dr. Aamir Liaquat Hussain, Anchor person of Alim Online, Geo Television, Karachi-Pakistan
    2. The producer of Alim Online, Geo Telvision, Karachi-Pakistan

    I am writing you to draw your attention to and request prompt action regarding the latest incident of Ahmadi lynchings, as urged on a popular and seemingly unregulated Pakistani television program. The Anchor person, also former federal minister for religious affairs suggested that the followers be killed as punishment for their religious views.

    According to the information that I have received, Dr. Amir Liaquat Hussain declared the murder of Ahmadi sect members to be necessary (Wajib ul Qatal) according to Islamic teachings, in ‘Alam Online’, aired on September 7, 2008. Dr. Amir repeated his instruction several times, urging fundamentalists Muslims to kill without fear.

    While on air the anchor person also pressured the other two Islamic scholars (from two different sects) on the program to support the statement. This resulted in a unanimous decision among the scholars, on air during a popular television show, to urge lynching with the intent to kill. This was not a one-off. On September 9 Mr Hussain answered a query with the comment that blasphemers are liable to be put to death.

    The killings On September 8 at 1:15 pm, 18 hours after the broadcast, six persons entered the Fazle Umer Clinic, a two-storey hospital at Mirpur Khas city. Two of them went to the second floor and started pressuring 45 year-old Dr. Abdul Manan Siddiqui to come downstairs to attend to a patient in crisis. Dr. Manan left his office and descended into an ambush. He was shot 11 times and died on the spot. His private guard was also shot and is in a serious condition. A woman was also injured by firing. The killers remained at the hospital until the doctor was declared dead, then they walked out of the building’s front entrance. Police registered the killers as unknown.

    On September 9, 48 hours after the broadcast, Mr. Yousaf, a 75 years old rice trader and district chief of the Ahmadi sect was killed on his way to prayers in Nawab Shah, Sindh province. Yousaf was fired on from people on motor bikes, and sustained three bullet wounds. He died on the way to the hospital. The assailants had taken a route past a police station. No one has been arrested.

    It is the responsibility of a government to tackle religious hatred, yet in Pakistan it flourishes. That it can bloom so publicly and has results both bloody and unpunished, is an embarrassment to a country that hopes to be taken seriously outside of its borders. While religious persons can incite murder on mainstream television shows without restraint or legal consequence, a country cannot hope to be considered mature. Neither can its leaders.

    In this context I demand that the government of Pakistan take immediate steps to stop further killings by other religious communities and to investigate the two cases reported above. Those responsible for the killings must be prosecuted and punished according to the law. Immediate measures to prohibit broadcasting and spreading religious hatred through the media.

    I further urge you to investigate those responsible for instigating murders through media broadcast. I also demand for a genuine and humane effort to be made to reintegrate the Ahmadi community into the social fabric of Pakistan. Their civil, human and religious rights must be protected. The government must take the lead to create a space for dialogue between opposing religious communities in Pakistan there by bringing an end to religious and communal violence in the country.

  14. PAKISTAN: No action taken against Geo TV presenter who incited Muslims to murder members of Pakistan minority on air – PAKISTAN: No action taken against Geo TV presenter who incited Muslims to murder members of Pakistan minority on air – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    AHRC-STM-244-2008 September 18, 2008 A Statement by the Asian Human Rights Commission http://www.ahrchk.net/statements/mainfile.php/2008statements/1694/

    The government of Pakistan has not held the presenter of a popular TV program on Geo TV, accountable for stoking the already-prevalent religious hatred of Pakistan’s beleaguered Ahmadi minority, on 7 September, 2008.

    Anchor person Dr Amir Liaquat Hussain declared, on air, the murder of Ahmadi sect members to be the religious duty of devout Muslims. He made the statement on Alim Online, a religious affairs program on Geo TV, which is a prominent Dubai-based Pakistani television channel. Hussain urged his two co-presenters to agree, and in a show on 9 September, he repeated the suggestion. In the 48 hours after the first broadcast, two Ahmadi community leaders were lynched and murdered, bringing the total number of targeted Ahmadi killings this year to four.

    Hussain, a self-titled doctor, was, ironically, the minister for religious affairs in the Musharraf government. He regularly expresses an open hatred of Pakistan’s minority groups, and his influence stretches far by way of daily on-air sermons and articles he writes for the Daily Jang newspaper, published by the same media house.

    The AHRC considers freedom of speech to be an important right, but it also insists on the right of the individual to personal safety and freedom from persecution. That Pakistan allows the use of broadcasting tools to spread direct messages of intense harm and hatred as a religious duty, is utterly disturbing.

    Religious intolerance flourishes in Pakistan, and there is very little done to temper the hatred felt by some Muslims for Ahmadi followers, Christians, Hindus, Sikhs and other minorities. In some cases the government clearly tries to court fundamentalists with its leniency regarding these crimes. The two most recent Ahmadi deaths were carried out in broad daylight, in public, but no arrests have been made. Dr Hussain has not been held accountable in any way, either by his employer or the government.

    The AHRC demands that a case be initiated and Dr Hussain be produced before the law. Geo TV must, at the very least, offer a full apology for its involvement in two murderous lynching cases, and must present a new list of broadcasting standards that it pledges to uphold. That religious hatred can bloom so publicly and remain unpunished is an embarrassment to a country that hopes to be taken seriously outside of its borders.

  15. Oh poor bilwal! It is so sad that your billionaire daddy could not launch you politiclally as was planned. You must be shaken that launching ceremony of your political career couldn’t become a reality but don’t worry daddy will take care of you. What a rubiish ! they are talking about launching bilawal as it was a launch of a hoolywood movie.

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